Going Back to (Electoral) College

Boy, I’ve been dealing with a lot of school lately. This fall semester, I started teaching as an adjunct professor at the New England School of Communication.

And on top of that, I also recently spent a few weeks enrolled at Electoral College:

In all honesty, before producing this video for ElectoralCollegeUSA, like the young man in the video, I didn’t quite know how the electoral process worked — but I knew it had something to do with Electoral Votes.

But the cool thing is, now I know. And more importantly, now I sound educated when I try to explain it to my kids. Also appearing in this video is my stepson Casey. Props to him for some pretty good acting, and for indulging me in yet another eyes-rolling “Oh, God, how is he gonna embarrass me NOW” moment.

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One response to “Going Back to (Electoral) College

  1. The major shortcoming of the current system of electing the President is that presidential candidates concentrate their attention on a handful of closely divided “battleground” states. In 2004 two-thirds of the visits and money were focused in just six states; 88% on 9 states, and 99% of the money went to just 16 states. Two-thirds of the states and people were merely spectators to the presidential election. Candidates have no reason to poll, visit, advertise, organize, campaign, or worry about the voter concerns in states where they are safely ahead or hopelessly behind. The reason for this is the winner-take-all rule under which all of a state’s electoral votes are awarded to the candidate who gets the most votes in each separate state.

    Another shortcoming of the current system is that a candidate can win the Presidency without winning the most popular votes nationwide.

    The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and DC).

    Every vote would be politically relevant and equal in presidential elections.

    The bill would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the electoral votes—that is, enough electoral votes to elect a President (270 of 538). When the bill comes into effect, all the electoral votes from those states would be awarded to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and DC).

    The National Popular Vote bill has passed 21 state legislative chambers, including one house in Arkansas, Colorado, Maine, North Carolina, and Washington, and both houses in California, Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, Maryland, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The bill has been enacted by Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, and Maryland. These four states possess 50 electoral votes — 19% of the 270 necessary to bring the law into effect.

    See http://www.NationalPopularVote.com

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